Tweens & Teens

New Online Resource to Prevent Teen Dating Violence

We’re pleased to announce the launch of a new online toolkit, a practical and interactive resource for anyone engaged in teen dating violence prevention. The site shares the lessons we learned while working on Wallstreet, a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in collaboration with Blue Shield of California Foundation.

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Futures Launches #WhereIAmMe Social Media Campaign

As part of our That’s Not Cool initiative, we just launched a social media campaign that asks teens across the country to tell us about the places where they can be themselves! The teenage years can be a tumultuous and isolating time for many, and it’s important to foster safe and healthy communities where teens can thrive.

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The Legalities of Sexting

The Legalities of Sexting

This month in Decatur, Illinois, 5 teenagers who shared nude photos of themselves via cell phone were arrested and now face felony child pornography charges. They range in age from 13 to 16. Though this story may seem shocking, the truth is teen sexting is happening in every state and county in America.

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That’s Not Cool Launches Ambassadors Program

That’s Not Cool Launches Ambassadors Program

We’re looking for a few good teens to join us as official That’s Not Cool Ambassadors. This is a unique opportunity to raise awareness on an issue that affects friends, family, and the community at large while having some fun in the process.

That’s Not Cool uses examples of pressure and control that occur in the digital world (online and via cell phone) to encourage young people to draw their own lines about what’s okay, or not okay, in relationships. Members of the That’s Not Cool Ambassadors team will gain valuable experience, national exposure, and meaningfully contribute to this award-winning initiative. Ambassador posts are open to boys and girls, age 13-19. To learn how to apply,

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Futures’ Work Featured in CDC’s Grand Rounds

Debbie Lee, Senior Vice President and Deputy Director of the Start Strong Initiative, presented last week to the Centers for Disease Control’s Public Health Grand Rounds – a monthly podcast highlighting promising practices in public health. [more...]

‘That’s Not Cool’ Wins Communicator Award

That’s Not Cool, a Futures Without Violence public education campaign, has been recognized with an Award of Excellence by the International Academy of Visual Arts for outstanding educational website. The annual Communicator Awards honors innovative communications initiatives that make a lasting impact in their field.

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Pressure to Share Passwords...Cool or Not Cool?

How would you feel about getting pressured to share your online passwords with someone you’re dating? This question is posed in the latest video to be released by the That’s Not Cool campaign as part of their speaking avatar application. Launched in July 2011, the speaking avatar tool encourages teens to have their say when it comes to pressure and control in their relationships. After watching an animated prompt video addressing digital dating abuse on the homepage, users create a personalized character and voice to respond to the question posed in the video. Each unique video entry can be posted and shared on www.thatsnotcool.com. [more...]

LA Unified School District Resolves to Prevent Teen Dating Violence

LA Unified School District Resolves to Prevent Teen Dating Violence

The Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) has unanimously approved a resolution that will call on schools to actively prevent teen dating violence – and kudos to Peace Over Violence's Start Strong program for leading the charge. [more...]

Start Strong Releases Model School Policy

Start Strong Releases Model School Policy

Many schools are responding to state laws and developing policies to prevent teen dating violence. Start Strong has developed a model policy with tools and resources for schools. [more...]

Teens "Talk Back" with New Avatar

Teens

Pressuring someone for nude pics…cool or not cool? Teens can now create personalized talking avatar videos to answer that important question. That’s Not Cool, a Futures Without Violence public education initiative, has launched this new tool that allows teens to “Have Your Say” when it comes to relationship abuse. [more...]

Legislation To Reduce Teen Dating Violence

In the wake of a growing number of teenagers killed from dating violence, Democratic and Republican legislators have joined together to introduce legislation to help schools address the problem of teen dating violence. [more...]

'That's Not Cool' Wins Youth Award

'That's Not Cool' Wins Youth Award

That’s Not Cool, a Futures Without Violence public education campaign, has been recognized as a Y-Pulse GennY Award Finalist. The GennY Award honors initiatives that use new and innovative techniques to connect with teens and tweens. [more...]

That's Not Cool

That's Not Cool

Developed by Futures Without Violence (formerly Family Violence Prevention Fund) in partnership with the Department of Justice’s Office on Violence Against Women and the Advertising Council, That’s Not Cool is a national public education campaign to prevent teen dating abuse. [more...]

Lessons from Literature

Lessons from Literature

Developed by Futures Without Violence and the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), Lessons from Literature is a free online resource that gives English teachers a framework to use the novels, poems, plays and stories they are already teaching to help their students build healthy, non-violent relationships. [more...]

Start Strong: Building Healthy Teen Relationships

Start Strong: Building Healthy Teen Relationships

Preventing intimate partner violence begins with ensuring that young people's first relationships are healthy ones. Start Strong: Building Healthy Teen Relationships, is a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation administered by Futures Without Violence to support the creation of community-based models of prevention that aim to prevent relationship violence among 11 to 14-year-olds. [more...]