2016 Reports and Articles about Global Gender-based Violence

Publications

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The Brookings Institution
From Paper State to Caliphate: The Ideology of the Islamic State
The Brookings Institution 2015

 

 

 

 

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Global Center on Cooperative Security
A Man’s World?: Exploring the Roles of Women in Countering Terrorism and Violent Extremism
Global Center on Cooperative Security 2016

 

 

 

 

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GRSDC Applied Knowledge Services
Women and Violent Extremism
GRSDC Applied Knowledge Services 2013

 

 

 

 

FemmeFetaleCoverU.S. Institute of Peace and U.S. Army War College
Femme Fatales – Why Women are Drawn to Fight with Violent Extremist Groups
U.S. Institute of Peace and U.S. Army War College 2016

 

 

 

 

YourFatwaYour Fatwa Does Not Apply Here: Untold Stories from the Fight against Muslim Fundamentalism
Karima Bennoune 2014

 

 

 

 

Articles

Boko Haram is Enslaving Women, Making them Join the War
Newsweek 2015

Countering Violence Extremism Means Countering Gender Inequality
War on the Rocks 2015

Debunking Stereotypes: Which Women Matter in the Fight Against Extremism?
International Civil Society Action Network (ICAN) Inter Press Service 2016

Dispatches: Protect Lives, Not Just Territory, Against Attacks
Human Rights Watch 2016

Has Anyone Here Been Raped by ISIS? The public’s interest in knowing explicit details of sexual violence must not outweigh these victims’ urgent need for safety and privacy.
The Daily Beast 2015

Mass Grave of ‘Yazidi women executed by ISIS’ Found in Iraq
Al Arabiya 2015

Survivors of ISIS in Iraqi Kurdistan
SEED 2016

United Nations Security Council Resolutions

UNSCR 1325

UNSCR 2122

UNSCR 2242

UNSCR 2250

 

Film

Weapon of War: Confessions of Rape In Congo
WEAPON OF WAR, an award-winning film honored by Amnesty International, journeys to the heart of this crisis, where we meet its perpetrators. In personal interviews, soldiers and former combatants provide open hearted but shocking testimony about rape in the DRC. Despite differing views on causes or criminal status, all reveal how years of conflict, as well as discrimination against women, have normalized brutal sexual violence. We also see former rapists struggling to change their own or others’ behavior, and reintegrate into their communities.