Improving Services for Violence Against Women and Children During COVID-19

A project of Futures Without Violence, the American Academy of Pediatrics and The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The frequency and severity of intimate partner violence (IPV) and child abuse during the COVID-19 pandemic has become exceedingly concerning. Since the start of the pandemic, survivors are facing unprecedented challenges including compounded levels of stress, economic strain and restricted opportunities for connection with social networks, hindering their ability to reach out for support. IPV advocates, pediatric health care providers and child welfare and family violence advocates are well positioned to ensure the unique needs of survivors, of all ages, are met during a national public health emergency.

 

img1-health-page-updatedThe Improving Services for Violence Against Children and Women project explores the state of IPV, child abuse and neglect, and community-based support agencies working to address the needs of IPV survivors in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Through a collaborative effort by Futures Without Violence, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), and research partner, the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh (UPMC), the project aims to identify unique needs, gaps, barriers, and potential improvements to service provisions within the context of a public health emergency.

 

SURVIVOR-CENTERED SUPPORT DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC

img2-health-page-updatedProject partners developed three issue briefs that focus on best practices and innovative strategies that IPV advocates, pediatric healthcare providers and child welfare and family violence advocates can implement to form stronger support networks for survivors of violence and abuse that continue to function in emergency conditions.

The briefs explore the connections between IPV and child abuse, the intersection of family violence with the COVID-19 pandemic, the inequities that shape them both, and practice and systems change recommendations for the field to better serve adult and child survivors during a national crisis. The briefs draw from research by UPMC, which includes a series of interviews with survivors, IPV advocates and administrators, and Child Protective Services (CPS) advocates, and share extensive resources.

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OTHER RESOURCES

img3-health-page-updatedInfographics for Pediatric Health Care Providers

Questions? Contact: health@futureswithoutviolence.org

This project is supported by the Cooperative Agreement Number, NU38OT000282, funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the American Academy of Pediatrics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or the Department of Health and Human Services.